Surp Giragos Church

Diyarbakır today is a large Kurdish city of more than 1 million inhabitants located on the banks of the Tigris River in Southeastern Turkey. Most of the city has over the past 40 years grown outside of the old city encircled by a long wall made of black basalt. Within the five gates of this... Continue Reading →

Signs of the Time

According to the WRD (World Register of Dams), Turkey has over 741 dams in operation, as well as several dozens under construction. These modern infrastructures, built to regulate floods or produce hydroelectricity, I argue here, constitute good chronological markers indicative of larger processes at hand in Turkey. Taken like archaeological artifacts, they have much to... Continue Reading →

Digging Tepe – A Funeral

Archaeologists often come across ancient human burials during their excavations. It is less often, however, that human burials come across archaeological excavations. This is what happened, however, to one particular funeral procession a few years ago, in the town of Tepe in Southeastern Turkey. The goal here* is, rather than arrive at a fixed definition of Ethics,... Continue Reading →

Contested Heritage

The southeastern provinces of Turkey will soon be home to a series of new, state-of-the-art, archaeology museums. Such buildings are being (or have already been) planned, constructed, remodeled, or expanded. The Gaziantep Museum, for instance, houses many of the Roman mosaics of Zeugma unearthed before the construction of the Birecik Dam. Other mosaics, discovered during... Continue Reading →

Emotions in Archaeological Science

Science, in its practice, is full of sound and fury, but it is hushed, pacified, sanitized, in its writing, almost signifying nothing. What happens to this fury? What happens to last-minute improvisation, to running from the office, to the laboratory, back to the office, to the madness of deadlines, and to all of the uncertainties... Continue Reading →

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